@sneadbyree

 

@sneadbyree
@sneadbyree

For the past several months, I’ve contemplated starting a Tumblr blog called todayssneakerdrama.tumblr.com. A sneaker version of the video game-focused todaysgamingdrama, it would highlight whatever moronic thing sneakerheads would be arguing about in the comments and on social media. I say “moronic” because 95% of the time sneakerheads get into arguments online, it’s usually just a difference in opinion over a particular colorway or the price of retros. And when that gets old, the conversation eventually devolves into the typical offensive/racist/misogynistic bile that most of us are used to seeing in YouTube comments and Facebook posts from high school friends.

But somewhere between creating the name of the blog and sifting through the sneaker internet to find something to talk about, I realized that I don’t actually hate myself. Why should I subject my sanity to the same negativity that has really become sneaker culture’s biggest barrier to entry? It’s not the resale market or the scarcity of hyped sneakers that has prevented more people from enjoying this world we have created; rather it’s the clowns that have nothing better to do but be a jackass when someone doesn’t share their taste in kicks. It’s an old boys club, but instead of rich old white people that turn their nose up on the rest of the world, it’s the kids and those who are ostensibly adults that wear Supreme hoodies and Yeezys (doesn’t matter if it’s Nike, adidas or Louis Vuitton) that raise a stink when something comes along that isn’t in their approved list of hype. And damn do they get loud when trends and sh*t aren’t going their way.

For the kid that’s trying to immerse themselves into the culture or the lapse fan that wants to come back, they might see a bleak picture of sneaker culture. Speak up for liking something that isn’t approved by the masses (or the loudest idiots) and you can experience a backlash that will make you leave altogether. Share a thought-provoking piece about kicks that digs deep into the business and production of kicks and you might be met with a “just post pictures and release dates” response that is about as boilerplate as it gets. There are ways to avoid this and still feel like you’re part of the sneaker community; you just have to navigate around the crappy parts. So here are 10 Ways To Avoid Hating The Culture Of Sneakers.